Books such as The Silver Cha have piqued curiosity concerning the aftermath of the Crucifixion. And now this book- one can...

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THE DARKNESS

Books such as The Silver Cha have piqued curiosity concerning the aftermath of the Crucifixion. And now this book- one can scarcely call it a novel- has for its purpose the tracing of the negative aspects of the picture. He has done this by using techniques that make the reading something of a challenge to the reader. The interchange of letters between such principals as Joseph of Arimathea and Nicodemus; between Herod, emotionally upset by the incident, and his sadistic wife, Herodias; between a young Roman officer and a friend, in regard to his anomalous position with Pilate's young wife, a cousin to whom he had been affianced. Then there are the communications of the secret agents, investigating the strange happenings at the tomb, the whereabouts of the followers of the dead leader, the suspected plottings of Herod and Pilate, the one against the other. And finally, there is the interchange of recriminations, accusations, explanations, Justifications on the part of the Sanhedrin. One gets a sense of a little world in turmoil of distrust and suspicion, hatred and thwarted ambition, stirred by what was supposedly a minor incident of eliminating a possible subversive influence. There is more than an echo of moods of today in the reflection of the moods of the period when Christ lived- and died. This is as it might have been.

Pub Date: June 11, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1954