A pleasant excursion into small-town, semi-rural Oregon during World War I, deftly told and--as usual with Lampman--packed...

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THREE KNOCKS ON THE WALL

A pleasant excursion into small-town, semi-rural Oregon during World War I, deftly told and--as usual with Lampman--packed with descriptive detail. Marry, a spunky seventh grader, discovers a mysterious stranger living behind the ten-foot wall that surrounds the house next door. The stranger turns out to be the illegitimate daughter of one of the neighbors. Through the good offices of Marty and her family, the child and her mother regain enough self-esteem to come out of hiding. Meantime, the reader is treated to a tintype of American life of yore--with Decoration Day outings to the Pioneers Cemetery, gold stars in parlor windows, loving families reading Hawthorne and Dickens aloud in the evenings, and tough old Grandmas who cure the flu with onion plasters and beef broth. The varieties of small-town prejudice--against Indians, Chinese, draft dodgers, and sinners--are also exposed; and Marty has a number of growing-up adventures, such as her first ""mixed"" party and the death of an older friend in the trenches. The plot is thin and the characters, in this case, relatively stereotyped; but the milieu, graphically and affectionately evoked, serves as compensation.

Pub Date: April 17, 1980

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Atheneum

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1980