This book is from the pen of one who has served for five years on the faculty of the Episcopal Theological Seminary at...

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CHRISTIANITY AND SYMBOLISM

This book is from the pen of one who has served for five years on the faculty of the Episcopal Theological Seminary at Cambridge. This particular study arose out of the writer's primary interest in the doctrine of the Sacraments as it has been developed within the Christian tradition, -Catholic, Eastern Orthodox and Protestant. He has endeavored to clarify the meaning of the sacraments in Christian history and today by a study of man's use of symbols throughout history. Accordingly, he examines in considerable detail the symbolism of nature, time and language, symbolic persons and symbolic action and, finally, water symbolism and Christian baptism and the symbolism of sacrifice and the Eucharist. Finding that symbols were developed in an economy when men were close to nature, the author deals with the problem of making ancient symbols meaningful in our urbanized, mechanized civilization, with the suggestion the modern conditions may necessitate the creation of new symbols more meaningful to modern men. A thoughtful presentation of a subject in which there is marked revival of interest. Professor Dillistone's approach is objective and non-sectarian.

Pub Date: Nov. 7, 1955

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Westminster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1955