Suns Go Down, in which he told the story of his grandmother, brought considerable fame to Flannery Lewis. Now -- in fiction...

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BROOKS TOO BROAD FOR LEAPING

Suns Go Down, in which he told the story of his grandmother, brought considerable fame to Flannery Lewis. Now -- in fiction form -- he tells his own story. The publishers are selling it as fiction; frankly I should be inclined to urge selling it as autobiography. It seems to me to have the sort of place and appeal that Coffin's Lost Paradise had, -- a recapturing of a boyhood. Quiet but poignant reminiscences, always through the eyes of the child and not of the adult looking back. The smallest of everyday events mark the story. Mark is sensitive, imaginative, gentle, quite unready to meet the assaults of first grade life. Convincingly, he conveys the impression of childhood's own sense of life, with its sorrows, fears, defeats. The style is poetic, with charm, wisdom and unusual sensitiveness of feeling.

Pub Date: Feb. 8, 1937

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1937