Bright but strangely silent, with a ""nervous tic,"" Florence Stirkel is forever ""doing"" every new thing and person with...

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GROWING ANYWAY UP

Bright but strangely silent, with a ""nervous tic,"" Florence Stirkel is forever ""doing"" every new thing and person with her eyes to make them ""safe"" for her. And the compulsion gets worse when she and her widowed mother move from a Florida house to a city apartment and her mother takes up with George B-for-boring Hawthorne, who carries around huge ""lumps of silence"" which he throws into his incessant monologues. Enter then father's sister Nina who makes everything okay, if not perfect--and who even helps Florence connect her ""tics"" with her guilt over withholding a good luck kiss when her father left on that last business trip. We're not as taken as Florence is with Aunt Nina's childish gaiety, but we're willing to go along with the niece--as her observations throughout have had more wit and point than those of most such bright young commentators on the domestic front.

Pub Date: May 12, 1976

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: 128

Publisher: Lippincott

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1976