This is a volume three in the proposed six volume definitive life of F.D.R., based in large part on study of the papers now...

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FRANKLIN D. ROOSEVELT: The Triumph

This is a volume three in the proposed six volume definitive life of F.D.R., based in large part on study of the papers now in the library at Hyde Park. This compasses the years as Governor of New York and -for the complete picture- is an important reference source, covering blow by blow the role as governor, the period of preparation for the largen role. But for the general public, this is unlikely to be as popular as The Apprenticeship and The Ordeal (1952 and 1954 respectively), perhaps because, outside political circles, the issues of those depression years seem to have paled, and the portrait of the Governor is less magnetic, has less of inspiration. F.D.R. battled his Republican legislature for his first term- and what he won, he won by adroit manipulation, what the legislators won was a Pyrrhic victory. Agriculture (a testing ground for national policies), water power, investigation and reform of the judiciary, of city government, a scientific approach to institutional reform-these were the issues. The second term was made to order for Roosevelt's growth in stature as an inevitable candidate for the presidency, and for the building of the men who brought him through to the White House. This for a depression governor in years of spiralling crisis makes an interesting study in politics and economics. But the volume is better in its whole than in its parts.

Pub Date: Sept. 6, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Little, Brown

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1956