Far from the atmospheric impressionism of his earlier books, is this sophisticated rather than subtle, worldly rather than...

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IDOLS OF THE CAVE

Far from the atmospheric impressionism of his earlier books, is this sophisticated rather than subtle, worldly rather than other-worldly story of a circumscribed circle in New York through the war years, the elaborate elite of exiles, aesthetes, socialities. Against the artifice of this milieu is told the story of four-of Jonathan, Lydia, Pierre and Delia. Jonathan, an innocent and something of an idealist, has a quixotic affair with Lydia, a ballerina, recognizes her insincerity, her infidelity, and contrasts her with his cousin's wife, Delia, of great beauty. However Delia falls in love with Pierre Maillard, an old friend of Jonathan's leaves her husband for Pierre, and as her love for Pierre increases in intensity, it also increases in insecurity and ends in destruction. This has not the literary distinction of the earlier Prokosch, but is more popular in theme, in treatment, and has a certain giltedge glamour.

Pub Date: Oct. 10, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1946