The publishers emphasize that The Transplanted is not autobiographical although it is this aspect, the retrospective...

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THE TRANSPLANTED

The publishers emphasize that The Transplanted is not autobiographical although it is this aspect, the retrospective familiarity of the refugee experience, which is most viable; as the novel it is intended to be it fails to get much beyond that well-remembered, well-intentioned commonplaceness. Ruth, now that her children are grown, tells her story to them of her experiences in Hitler's Germany and after. From an assimilated, acculturated Jewish family, she had married a Junker Manfred who turns against her gradually. With the death of their child from polio, politically a ""bastard"" and refused vaccine, she leaves Manfred at his suggestion for the U.S. Follows her experiences in menial jobs, homes, restaurants, finally a hospital working with crippled children; in spite of other offers, she remains completely (inexplicably?) loyal to Manfred, keeps a diary for him, and when he finally percolates via Chile, they remarry...Mrs. Stoetzner's book has many German characteristics (it has been very successful over there)--namely stolidity, stamina and a kind of sentimentality which sometimes passes for gemutlichkeit, regretted in the new Germany revisited. These are both virtues and limitations.

Pub Date: Nov. 17, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: McGraw-Hill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1966