First-novelist Ross tells the story of a one-time ad-agency executive--imprisoned for the murder of his common-law wife--who...

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TEARS OF THE MOON

First-novelist Ross tells the story of a one-time ad-agency executive--imprisoned for the murder of his common-law wife--who shares his dreams with the prison shrink, considers capitulating to the importunings of a fond fellow inmate, and ponders The Meaning of It All as the date for his parole review approaches. It behooves one to be ever on the alert with this exceedingly serious work, as one is in and out of the past, in and out of jail, in and out of the hemisphere, and in and out of love without the aid of a single quotation mark. Dashes abound, however, in the musings and ramblings of one Owen Wesley, younger son of an alcoholic and unpleasant union supervisor and his too-weak wife. Owen has lost Angela, his longtime love, in a plunge to the bottom of a bluff. Did she fall? Did she jump? Did Owen push her? Would he have pushed her if she hadn't jumped? Would their life together have been different if they hadn't been quite so accepting of each other's affairs? Was it a problem that his favorite uncle was homosexual? What was the effect of having a brother who was not only academically and athletically gifted but also a prince of a fellow? So much to consider. And so much time to consider it in. Stern Canadian justice believed witnesses and sent Owen to prison--where he has lost his unpleasant civilian flab and become quite fit in the gym, successfully fending off advances both violent and polite until now, near the end, when his friend Val seems to be wearing him down. . . Writing. Lots and lots of writing.

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 1988

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Viking

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1988