Even if you don't know a modified barrel from an improved barrel or how to tie No. 18 bivisibles, you can mosey through Hill...

READ REVIEW

HILL COUNTRY

Even if you don't know a modified barrel from an improved barrel or how to tie No. 18 bivisibles, you can mosey through Hill Country and come up smiling. Field and Stream columnist Hill gamely expands on hunting and hunters, fishing and fishermen, and the various pieces--amusing, sentimental, reflective, angry--have style and integrity. He's the kind of outdoorsman who sees hunting as a heritage, not a brutal hobby, and his recollections attest to a lifelong appreciation: ""I know a lot of men who had nothing else to give their boys except a homemade blind at a kettle pond and an evening flight."" But he sees the humorous sides as well, and several essays reveal a wonderfully idiosyncratic peripheral vision. ""The average fly-fisherman is more concerned with serf-defense than a light-heavyweight."" . . . ""A successful duck hunter has to learn to think like a duck."" Leery of liberationists, he refers to his wife as The Chairman and gladly shares the chores--she can clean his gun any time; and in a piece called ""Hits and Ms.,"" he elaborates after asking, ""Can you say 'fisherperson' out loud without feeling silly?"" Also, Texas foods (""sauces that are hot enough to weld steel""), budgeting (""A Penny Saved Is Unlikely""), and a homemade unit of encumbrance called the Zern: ""A basic Zern is at least 50 percent more than necessary in number, at least 50 percent heavier to carry than it need be, and should take up at least 50 percent more room."" A winning trophy--give it more than a sporting chance.

Pub Date: Aug. 30, 1978

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dutton

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1978