Gene Klavan has an early morning radio show in New York, and predictably this features an effortless patter of witticisms,...

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TURN THAT DAMNED THING OFF

Gene Klavan has an early morning radio show in New York, and predictably this features an effortless patter of witticisms, but there's also a serious undercurrent of concern with the smothering influence of TV and radio on our lives. Klavan's main gripe seems to be that reality -- world, national and local events, from riots to politics to sports -- is now processed entertainment: ""What is a real person and what is a performer. . .when there are so many microphones and cameras waiting to record and play back everything we say and do?"" In intermittently comic turns, Klavan gives advice on how the protester or opinion-giver can achieve peak impact on the late night news; or if you're an aspiring actor how to try out as, say, a tired businessman in a birdseed commercial. He reviews the roles of sports stars (whatever happened to the plug uglies of yesteryear) and bets heavily that games are now structured for the TV cameras. He discusses the selling of politicians; the electronic soul of rock (music festivals are just ""live television on tour""); and the performing TV critic who has evolved from simply a reviewer into ""Jo Jo the Art-Wit."" Klavan anticipates all the monstrous technological advances looming ahead which promise a choice of a ""hundred different audiovisual activities"" transmitting. . .what? An amiable affirmation of the title.

Pub Date: Oct. 1, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Bobbs-Merrill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1972