In the annals of World War II histories, the term German justice may be regarded by most as a misnomer. This novel amply...

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THE COURT OF HONOR

In the annals of World War II histories, the term German justice may be regarded by most as a misnomer. This novel amply verifies that conclusion. The Court of Honor germinates from what appears to be a centuries old German custom...Try and Rule by terror and above all keep the fanatic German patriotism alive. When aristocratic General von Bluckau conceives the idea of the revival of the Fehme, an underground terrorist group with roots firmly in the past, the blinded general is looking firmly toward the future-- German surrender, the dissipation of Nazi control, the instinctive need for a cohesive directive force that would allow the German people to retain their pride and subvert the disruptive influence of enemy occupation. His motive is essentially an idealistic/patriotic one. But when his plans are taken over by martin Bormann (real life aid to Hitler), the whole cell structure of the Gestapo regime becomes repeated. So far, so very, very disconcerting. But as the first Fehme trial begins, with von Bluckau presiding, it soon becomes evident that truth is indeed stranger than fiction even though the defendants include a German priest, English and American representatives, the SS skull specialist at Auschwitz whose wife dearly loved lamp shades, and, as a final blow, von Bluckau's desperate, nymphomaniac wife. The final escape scenes are abysmally melodramatic and what started out as a taut What If? drama, degenerates into a woolly Night of the Generals hangover.

Pub Date: March 31, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1966