Making capital of the exotic without making integral motives apparent makes Feifferesque Arthur's disporting a double...

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ARTHUR'S ARTICHOKE

Making capital of the exotic without making integral motives apparent makes Feifferesque Arthur's disporting a double enigma: just what, if you don't -- and children won't -- know from artichokes, is ""a vegetable with a heart""; and when, in the interest of simple coherence, does the unassuming zoo-attendant hanker for a pet? The fruit-stand man said, ""you eat the heart,"" but Arthur unfoundedly adopts the artichoke; several interludes later, after flying it from a balloon string, he's lamenting -- ""'My artichoke broke its heart.'"" ""But what Arthur did not know is that all artichokes ripen in the sun and burst, spreading their seeds all over the ground. . . in the most unlikely zoo places."" There being literal problems (proportion, distinction) together with the teasing deployment of color and line, the pictures are also engaging/confusing: like the story, brashly unassertive; and like artichokes, an acquired taste?

Pub Date: Dec. 15, 1970

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dial

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1970