Dealing with a far wider expanse than their last collaborative effort (Women in White, 1972) and accordingly more...

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THE STORY OF MEDICINE IN AMERICA

Dealing with a far wider expanse than their last collaborative effort (Women in White, 1972) and accordingly more superficial or arbitrarily selective -- this is one of those purposeful surveys wadded with information from contemporary sources of all kinds and spotted throughout with short biographies of the more famous figures. Thus from the Virginia Colony where physicians (only three or four had degrees) were socially superior to surgeons, to the ""future of medical practice"" which settles around the Mayo and Kaiser clinics omitting any of the awesome problems medicine now faces -- you can read along, or not, about early practitioners and remedies and hospitals, medical education, research, reforms, specialties or systems (osteopathy for example). There are assorted chapters on plagues, polio, neurosurgery, ""obsolescence"" or replacements and aerospace medicine leaving you to wonder whatever happened to say cancer or v.d. or. . . . As for the presentation, it's about as distinctive as the common cold.

Pub Date: Jan. 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Scribners

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1973