A fantasy of modern American life which stretches from a horse with a trust fund to a reporter and a banker who swap...

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THE GRASS IS ALWAYS GREENER

A fantasy of modern American life which stretches from a horse with a trust fund to a reporter and a banker who swap personalities. Sherman, a tall, rakish, fun-loving political reporter from Sacramento is covering a governors' convention in Philadelphia. Baxter Oldershaw, bank official, is in the city for his aunt's funeral. They don't know each other, but both get thoroughly pixilated, and next day Sherman is roly poly Baxter, and Baxter is tall lean Sherman. They exchange homes, lives and loves- a challenge to their wits and their creator's ingenuity. He makes the reader know and see his characters; he has brilliant bursts of satire; he is bawdy; he's corny; he's dull. He's reminiscent of Thorne-Smith -- and he's irritatingly pseudo. Readers will either take him to their hearts- or hate him. At least he supplies comic relief.

Pub Date: Oct. 23, 1947

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 1, 1947