An American, a priest, and the only ""free"" Catholic voice in Russia, the author during the early 1950's was an exceedingly...

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MOSCOW WAS MY PARISH

An American, a priest, and the only ""free"" Catholic voice in Russia, the author during the early 1950's was an exceedingly popular figure among the entire foreign colony as well as the Marines stationed in Moscow. Skating on thin political ice until his unexplained expulsion last year (this was an act of retaliation against the State Department), the multi-lingual priest was a man of many interests and activities. He organized a crack hockey team among the Marines, played the game himself along with Ambassador Bohlen. He mastered bridge, small talk, and the art of mixing martinis- which put him on close terms with the diplomatic world where he could present a fairer view of the Catholic position and gain some international support for maintaining the Church in Russia. He set up a choral group, musical evenings, volley ball games, and many other morale-building entertainments. And his story includes many of his travels into Central Asia and the so-called Russian Riviera.... An engaging first person story, which reflects the warmth and breadth of the man and is not too strongly political nor religious in its stress. Persons of any faith, or none at all, will enjoy it.

Pub Date: April 23, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: McGraw-Hill

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1956