Homeland"" is a catholic term when applied to the Gardoz background for Papa Gardoz has an itching foot- and a memory of a...

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HOMELAND

Homeland"" is a catholic term when applied to the Gardoz background for Papa Gardoz has an itching foot- and a memory of a brief career in America which acquires a halo with passing years. Always he wants to go on to greener fields; always he boasts loudly of his native Jura. His wife had ""married beneath her"" and never let him forget it; but her love of hearth and home was not enough to deflect him once he had involved himself in a situation for which the sole answer- to him- was to vanish. And vanish he would-and eventually collect his loving (?) family about him again-though his advance seemed a leapfrog performance in a descending economic and social spiral. The story, if fiction it is, bears the earmarks of a nostalgic looking back on a boyhood in Switzerland, and its borders,- of a turbulent family, a mother who was their only strength, a father who supplied the yeast, sundry brothers and sisters, towns, villages, imposing chateaus, hovels, schools of all kinds, rowdies and gentle-folk for playmates, and a variety of experience. One could wish that the story had been tightened into a less sprawling form- and that a glimpse of their invasion of America in the early 1900's had been given- at the close.

Pub Date: July 18, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1946