.... which seems to grow greater rather than less, as his hatred of the Reds wars with his underlying devotion and loyalty...

READ REVIEW

DON CAMILLO'S DILEMMA

.... which seems to grow greater rather than less, as his hatred of the Reds wars with his underlying devotion and loyalty to the Mayor, Peppone. There is more of the internal struggle as Peppone himself finds his inclinations conflicting with the political creed he has embraced; as the townsfolk, who vote for the people's republic act on other issues on the basis of traditional concepts. Even Peppone's wife secretly prays for the defeat of the Party. Once again we have a pastiche of memorable fragments about the townspeople in the village where Peppone and Don Camillo wage their friendly feud. Once again the absurd rubs elbows with the nostalgic; Don Camillo reconciles himself with his conscience in intimate talks with his God and Peppone blusters and compromises. There is greater unevenness than in its predecessors, and some of the incidents seem fairly remote from the immediate interest in the main characters. But they all add to the amalgam which makes the village live.

Pub Date: June 23, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Farrar, Straus & Young

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1954