A portrait of a most elegant papa who devoted himself to the Art of Living has the ambiguous air that so charming and...

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FATHER SETS THE PACE

A portrait of a most elegant papa who devoted himself to the Art of Living has the ambiguous air that so charming and heedless a gentleman would evoke in the family group. A born bachelor who was at his best in his Paris club, he needed a wife to support him in style, and found one in a provincial aristocrat whose views of breeding and tradition, though quite as strong as his own, differed sharply. Mama was a puritan sort with a sense of virtue and no needs at all; Papa believed in being above doing and was all needs. He fretted against her dowdiness and flaunted his individuality in the face of her guardian-of-the-estate continuum concept- and he refused to allow her to ride a bike she loved because it was not good form. The flourishes of daily living were his forte, and he sallied into dressing, entertaining, riding and hunting and witty conversation with unfailing zest. The feud with his brother, an equally extraordinary and completely contrasting person, a rough, renowned explorer, ended only in death. There is full play here of papa's dramatic and demanding attitudes, all smoothly styled. They give a departed era and personality a deserved memorial.

Pub Date: Aug. 25, 1955

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1955