Of more than academic interest because of the Eagleton case, this concise analysis of the issues involved in treating public...

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THE VIP WITH PSYCHIATRIC IMPAIRMENT

Of more than academic interest because of the Eagleton case, this concise analysis of the issues involved in treating public leaders for emotional illness touches on such questions as who should determine when aberrant behavior impairs effectiveness and how to make that determination, the consequences of medical intervention and disclosure, and how to overcome the obvious barriers to voluntary treatment. There are also thumbnail case histories of sufferers -- George III of England, Wood-row Wilson (disabled by progressive arteriosclerotic brain disease), Earl Long of the Louisiana family, James Forrestal (the first Secretary of Defense whose depression eventually led to suicide), and others. Prepared by GAP's Committee on Governmental Agencies, the report's most stimulating -- and controversial -- section concludes with the recommendation that ""all VIPs"" should be subject to ""regular, complete, routine, and repeated medical examinations"" by panels of highly qualified doctors, including psychiatrists. In addition, the committee appends a draft constitutional amendment which establishes procedure to handle presidential disability due to psychiatric reasons. A sane and reasonable treatment.

Pub Date: Feb. 1, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Scribners

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1972