Strong belief in the efficiency of the British Civil Service and an eye for colorful detail mark the author's memoirs of his...

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SUDAN DAYS AND WAYS

Strong belief in the efficiency of the British Civil Service and an eye for colorful detail mark the author's memoirs of his quarter century of service with that organization in the Sudan. Roughly, Mr. Jackson's tenure corresponds to the first twenty five years of joint sovereignty which started in 1898. Fresh from the university and full of the zest which lasted him his career, he arrived in Khartoum in 1907 and spent his first year of learning the ropes in that city. What emerges as he writes on about the various other posts he held- ones all over the Sudan, that lead to the governorship of two provinces- is the extreme breadth and varied character of the country. While the description is personal and from the British viewpoint, sometimes to the extent of excluding a deeper understanding of native life, it is frank and there is an equal zest for all experiences whether big game hunting, or solving a local thievery, or listening to the ironical adventures of the great soldier Slatin Pasha, or settling a serious land dispute with an entire tribe. Though this has not the liveliness required for general interest, it is good armchair adventuring for the interested and thorough history and on the scene reporting highlights the problems of an African trouble spot.

Pub Date: May 28, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: St. Martin's Press

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: May 1, 1954

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