A quiet, well-phrased, article-length essay on the Duke of Windsor's own experience as an heir-and after, and an appraisal...

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THE CROWN AND THE PEOPLE

A quiet, well-phrased, article-length essay on the Duke of Windsor's own experience as an heir-and after, and an appraisal of the British Monarchy as a living institution. As an introduction, he surveys the social standing of the monarchy over the past half century- contrasting its economic straights with its still meaningful role as a symbol of the peoples' ideals, and picturing alongside the other fallen houses of Europe. Of the two reigns that preceded his short one, he gives short appraisals that contain more of pageantry than politics and offer no new interpretations other than glimpses of his own feelings at the time. Had his own reign continued, he predicts it would have been Edwardian, like his Grandfather's. In contrast, George VI, was like his father's and for his niece Elizabeth II, he holds high hopes in spite of the feeling many have that this coronation could well be Britain's last.

Pub Date: Jan. 25, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Funk & Wagnalls

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1954