A sprawling, unselective, overlong folk novel of the Icelandic crofters, of sombre and superstition-ridden peoples, living...

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INDEPENDENT PEOPLE

A sprawling, unselective, overlong folk novel of the Icelandic crofters, of sombre and superstition-ridden peoples, living from hand to mouth and yet stubbornly independent, preferring to slay their own rather than take from others. Here, in grim, savage term, is the story of Bjartur, a hard, dour man, his wives, his children, and the strange link that bound him to the first born, whom he casts out when she comes back to him- pregnant. Here too, is an illustration of the backwardness, the brutalization, which is at the base of his stubborn insistence on achieving the status of an independent man, a ""lone-worker"", which is only another form of bondage. A bleak and bitter book, with little to interest or attract the American reader, this is by the author of Salka Valka which Houghton, Mifflin published in 1936.

Pub Date: July 25, 1946

ISBN: 0679767924

Page Count: -

Publisher: Knopf

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1946