There's really more about the men and the expedition than about actual sharks as the author of Diving to Adventure, etc.,...

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MEN AND SHARKS

There's really more about the men and the expedition than about actual sharks as the author of Diving to Adventure, etc., fills in more of their underwater experiences and excitement. Starting with his stint of lecturing to raise money for the new trip, he lines up his old Caribbean crew, Alfred and Joerg and Heinz, adds Dr. Beckh and eventually picks up as interpreter, Xenophon, who turns out to be larger than life when he unfolds his story in Greek waters. The troubles in organizing, the test dives and equipment failure, the shake down and the decision to work around the Sporades islands lead them into social moments with the islanders, new problems in making their moving pictures, the necessity of using poachers' methods (dynamiting) to attract their subjects, the finding of the cavern and shaft at Planit, and a series of ailments and mishaps. In spite of Barrows Mussey's smooth translation from the German this still has the somewhat jumbled and jumpy reporting of the earlier books and a similar adolescent heartiness. Moving pictures have mass appealed this author but he's no competitor to Cousteau.

Pub Date: March 25, 1954

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1954