Women never have a stronger hold on men than when they are armed with all their weaknesses and delicacies,"" coos columnist...

READ REVIEW

NEVER GO ANYWHERE WITHOUT A PENCIL

Women never have a stronger hold on men than when they are armed with all their weaknesses and delicacies,"" coos columnist Van Home on one of her anti-Lib benders; but possibly Miss Van Home presupposes a female readership, since her political commentary has a cool, strong logic and her social outrages are far from limp. The essays -- current and harking back to 1968 -- include thoughts on a range of matters from death (the murders of New York City) to taxes (""tax loopholes and preferences to oil men, mine owners and other privileged citizens lose the U.S. Treasury an estimated $40 billion a year""). She comments on gossipy news items like Tricia's wedding cake, the Easter Parade, the new fashions; but there's also a somber analysis of the Kent State and Attica tragedies (she quotes Nietzsche: ""Distrust all those in whom the desire to punish is strong""), superpatriots, the My Lai massacre, etc, along with a number of chiffon (but never chintzy) thoughts on food, housewifely minutiae, and holidays. Libbers who chaffed at Van Horne's daisy chain put-downs might regret that her recent blast against the Miss America contest is not included, likewise her famous report on her psychiatrist-neighbor's visits with Richard Nixon is not here -- but for the following, a representative selection.

Pub Date: Nov. 20, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Putnam

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1972