A foreign correspondent with a long list of books, many of them on European affairs, has written an exceedingly useful book...

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THE ORDEAL OF THE CAPTIVE NATIONS

A foreign correspondent with a long list of books, many of them on European affairs, has written an exceedingly useful book in this survey of the countries of east-central Europe and their fate under the Soviet heel. Most of them, between the wars, had made strides towards freedom, only- in a comparatively short time, to succumb to the crushing power of the Soviet and become puppet states. Much has been written of Yugoslavia, of Poland, of Hungary, of Greece, but almost nothing has been told us of what has actually happened in the three little Baltic states, whose very identity has been obliterated, and whose populations have been liquidated. Three others- Czechoslovakia, Bulgaria and Albania, retain their identity, but are so completely quelled and dominated that no spark of leadership remains. In Rumania, in Hungary, in Poland, unrest, revolution-in varying degrees- stresses the seething hatred for the masters, and in them the spirit of liberty is still alive. There is a quick look at history, a step by step survey of events as they happened in the subjugation process, something of the key individuals in each country, and- so far as is possible, a crisp analysis of the current situation, politically, economically. While perhaps not a penetrating study, this recommends itself strongly to the average reader as a quick survey of those captive nations that Russia now controls.

Pub Date: July 17, 1958

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1958