In the Spring of 1944, Vice President Wallace was sent as a good will representative to Soviet Asia. This is the record of...

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SOVIET ASIA MISSION

In the Spring of 1944, Vice President Wallace was sent as a good will representative to Soviet Asia. This is the record of that mission, an optimistic, sympathetic, enthusiastic record, which will introduce the average American reader to a part of the world of which too little is known. From Minneapolis to Irkutsk, 7000 miles via Alsib Line, Wallace and his party traversed in comparatively few days, the vast reaches of Siberia, visited mushrooming industrial towns, talked with the men- and women- who were giving of themselves to build a new frontier near the Arctic. Urban growth has proved that climate need be no obstacle- and he compares the region with our own Northwest and Alaska. Then on to the trans-Siberian towns, facing West- where the others had faced East. He took excursions by plane, by boat, to central Soviet Asia,- to Lake Beikal, to the Yeniser River, to the steppes- he saw Siberia's past and Soviet Asia's future. He reveals the close integration of urban development with a strong agriculture, collectivized and mechanized farms. He discusses the peoples, the government, the wartime impact of Western culture. The last third of the book deals with the end of his trip, on the Sino-Soviet frontier, in Mongolia, in China. The texts of his speeches reiterate the importance of cultivating friendship in peace as in war. Too bad the book has been so long in appearing- it seems oddly dated, though surely needed more now than then.

Pub Date: June 24, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Reynal & Hitchcock

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 1, 1946