This book was not reviewed by this department originally for two very good reasons: the publishers didn't consider it a...

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RETURN TO RELIGION

This book was not reviewed by this department originally for two very good reasons: the publishers didn't consider it a religious book, they did not send galleys to be reviewed. This book belongs in the self-help class. It is not religion and it is poor psychology to have come from the pen of a psychologist. The emphasis is chiefly on forcing oneself to do this and that, from going with unattractive people to being seen in church to please one's in-laws -- a sort of coueistic plan for growing better without knowing it. Dr. Link woke up to the fact that though he had been an agnostic, he had returned to religion by telling clients they should. As a rule this isn't very satisfactory and better results can be obtained by first having a definite experience to share. Giving away what we haven't got is not very convincing and often causes the feeling of distrust for social workers and clergy that makes the man in the streets consider them hypocrites. However, in spite of it's being twaddle, the Reader's Digest gave it a start; people like sheep began to buy it. Now the advertising in ""This Week"" will undoubtedly make it necessary to keep a pile wrapped near the door so you can let the public have what it thinks it wants. It is a book you'll have to stock in some quantity now, but you'll want to be careful about recommending it. It may be good merchandise and roll up sales but it is not for the shop which gives value received.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Macmillan

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1937