In the same series as the Oscar Wilde, here is a book devoted completely to criticism of Wolfe in a thorough dissection and...

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THOMAS WOLFE

In the same series as the Oscar Wilde, here is a book devoted completely to criticism of Wolfe in a thorough dissection and analysis of his work, carefully comparing it with that of Proust, Whitman, Emerson, Melville, Henry James, Joyce, etc., in a search for his proper place in literature. Only after flaying Wolfe for his many faults of craftsmanship,- his lack of form, loose construction, infatuation with the sound of his own words, and subjecting his bombastic prose to a debilitating microscope,- is his genius grudgingly allowed, his position as ""America's closest approach to Homer"" granted. A good solid grounding in Wolfe's writings is necessary to grasp fully the context. For the uninitiated, Hungry Gulliver (see P. 641), is a better introduction- and this book's excellent bibliography supplies other leads. There's a sure market for this, in the Wolfe fans, but the book is designedly a scholarly analysis. Both books are good- in different ways- and complement each other.

Pub Date: N/A

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: New Directions

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: June 15, 1947