Cam had come back to Buffalo Coulee, the prairie town that he had put behind him in his restless youth. Now, with the Korean...

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THE SHADOW OF MY HAND

Cam had come back to Buffalo Coulee, the prairie town that he had put behind him in his restless youth. Now, with the Korean War scarring his life, he found that what he wanted was the feel of the land. He came by way of the jungles, stolen rides on the cars, hitch-hiking. He made strange friends- and together a kind of brotherhood came into existence. They ""hired out""- some of them- on the Durham farm, and Cam hoped he could gradually win status as a tenant farmer, not just a hired hand. His troubles came in his growing to love Millie -- and the desperate trouble it made with his base and with the young man about town, MacLean. The knowing picture this gives of the give and take of town and rural area, of the echelons that develop socially, economically, as farmer yields to townsman, of strange rivalries and loyalties, makes a vital slice of the frontier that survives in the American west. But the story itself seems to thin out in its shifts of focus, and what stays by you is the deepening sense of the call of the land.

Pub Date: March 1, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harcourt, Brace

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1956