There is no ""story"" connected with Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur, Greenfeld notes at the outset: ""Instead, they are...

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ROSH HASHANAH AND YOM KIPPUR

There is no ""story"" connected with Rosh Hashanah or Yom Kippur, Greenfeld notes at the outset: ""Instead, they are concerned solely with complicated abstract ideas, such as 'sin,' 'repentance,' 'redemption,' 'man's relationship to God,' and 'man's moral resonsibilities."" This is therefore a more demanding little volume than its predecessors in the series, with content that lends itself even less to a picture-book presentation. Still, Greenfeld does well under the circumstances, explaining simply--without oversimplification--not only the rituals but the concepts and prayers (including the Kol Nidrei or annullment of thoughtless vows). He also specifies what is expected--and not expected--of a child. The overall effect is to make observance seem less a duty than a privilege, ""the last chance for repentance and for forgiveness."" And the sobriety and restraint of the book's design provide an appropriate setting.

Pub Date: Sept. 20, 1979

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Holt, Rinehart & Winston

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1979