An oddly appropriate biography-cum-explanation of Buckminster Fuller's theories by a longtime admirer and friend. Bucky is...

READ REVIEW

BUCKY: A Guided Tour of Buckminster Fuller

An oddly appropriate biography-cum-explanation of Buckminster Fuller's theories by a longtime admirer and friend. Bucky is perhaps America's strangest guru -- an old Harvard drop-out who, though not an architect, has designed what is both the cheapest and most stable architectural structure, the geodesic dome; who, though not an engineer, has designed the maxi-efficient three-wheeled Dymaxion car; who, though not a poet, has held the Charles Norton Eliot poetry chair at Harvard. The book overflows with a cyclical jumble of ideas and personal data and connections between sailing and politics and children's toys and arcane physics theory moving the way Bucky's lectures do -- from the minute to the grandiose to the extraordinary in one breathtaking sentence -- an actual metaphoric replica of synergy-in-process, showing not only what to think but how to think -- for Fuller's originality derives not so much from the discovery of what is new as the rearrangement of the known in new and exciting ways, to the envy and irritation of his detractors. Perhaps more than anything Fuller is an indefatigable popularizer of ideas so sane they seem crazy, an optimistic prophet of peace and plenty via efficient distribution of current resources which he believes are adequate to the decent maintenance of the entire world population -- a startling anomaly and ""up"" in this era of apocalyptic despair, ZPG, and threats of imminent ecological despair. A fine introduction, necessarily somewhat confusing, to a great and good man of fascinating ideas.

Pub Date: Feb. 13, 1972

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Morrow

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1972