Of the five books in this new series, this is the washout: a guide to the physical aspects of menopause with a single-minded...

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YOUR MIDDLE YEARS: A Doctor's Guide for Today's Woman

Of the five books in this new series, this is the washout: a guide to the physical aspects of menopause with a single-minded emphasis on estrogen therapy and a ""jollying along"" tone that will turn most readers off. The author, a physician/researcher specializing in menopause, looks quickly at the social and historical aspects of menopause (noting that a woman's attitudes are affected by society's treatment of the aging process); covers the anatomy and physiology of women's cycles (in typically yucky language: ""Headquarters works overtime producing large amounts of GRH and FSH and LH, but the poor old ovary is exhausted and cannot respond""); and then discusses estrogen therapy, pro and con--and ultimately pro. If a single indication for its use exists, Utian says, it's in relation to preventing weakening of the skeleton--though he concedes that this may also be affected by diet and exercise. He also acknowledges that symptoms not directly related to hormone-loss won't be helped. But on the whole he's sanguine, upbeat, or just plain callow (""Loss of hormones after menopause can result in smaller breasts. Of course, fatter individuals will hardly notice the difference""). For a more balanced, less condescending outlook, readers should stick with Alice Lake's Our Own Years (1979).

Pub Date: April 1, 1980

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Appleton-Century/Prentice-Hall

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1980