The struggle to preserve our ""pitifully few"" historical landmarks has suddenly become important to more than the...

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AMERICA'S HISTORIC HOUSES

The struggle to preserve our ""pitifully few"" historical landmarks has suddenly become important to more than the organizations dedicated to that goal. Tourists are seeking out the houses of famous people, the sites of significant events, the ""living museums"" where skillful restorations are recapturing America's past. This book will be not only entertaining but useful. With its 300 photographs, it serves as a partial inventory of the Registry of National History and Landmarks, established in 1960. Prior to that date a national survey had uncovered hundreds of sites worth preserving; back in 1850 the first move was made to preserve Washington's headquarters in Newburgh, and nine years later, Mt. Vernon. The National Trust was founded in 1949. The arrangement is regional: New England, Middle Atlantic, South, Mid West and West. Under each section the houses and/or settlements (living museums such as Williamsburg) are roughly alphabetical in order. Something of the history, the people, the architectural facets and the furnishings are noted. And following each entry, there is brief data on location, days and hours of opening, costs. Dual market for tourists, for architectural and antique buffs.

Pub Date: Nov. 4, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Hawthorn

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1966