Stone may be right in sensing a resurgence of interest in the hard-living, prolific evolutionist/socialist/storyteller(see...

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IRVING STONE'S JACK LONDON

Stone may be right in sensing a resurgence of interest in the hard-living, prolific evolutionist/socialist/storyteller(see Sinclair, above), though the new London audiences may not be quite satisfied with the ""American folk hero"" approach taken in Stone's jaunty 1938 biography, Sailor on Horseback, here reprinted in ""thoroughly corrected and updated"" form. Nor may they place much faith in Stone's passing suggestion--in his introduction to a selection of 27 (""my favorite"") stories plus Call of the Wild--that London's importance surpasses that of Hemingway and Fitzgerald. The stories, which include six items of 1895 juvenilia (London was nineteen) as well as the inevitable ""To Build a Fire,"" lean predictably on Yukon tales of cold and gold, with a few welcome sidetrips south to bustling California and the houses and factories of London's ""finest proletarian"" story, ""The Apostate."" Both the biography and the fiction have been generally available elsewhere; piggyback, they'll present an odd, bulky forced marriage.

Pub Date: Aug. 26, 1977

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1977