The author, a writer and rabbi has compiled here an analysis of modern American Judaism based on a neries of sermons...

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The author, a writer and rabbi has compiled here an analysis of modern American Judaism based on a neries of sermons delivered at the Brooklyn Jewish Center. Dividing organized American Jewry into four camps, Orthodox, Reform, Conservative, and Reconstructionist, he clearly Indication what he believes to be the strength and weakness of each; the Orthodox, in sense overgmatic, but holding at its core the very essence of Jewish tradition, must, be feels, become somewhat more flexible in order to observe that primary concept of Judsiam -- the coustant renewal of the law, the Reform that in its zeal to accommodate to a historical climate which permits assimilation, has held many potential within the Jewish community, but by virtue of its tendency to compromise, has, to some extent, lost its distinctively Jewish flavor; the Conservative, which intellectually and emotionally interprets Judaism in a way which is compatible with contemporary thought without losing the essential Jewish outlook, but which Rabbi Levinthal believes suffers a dearth of truly inspirational leadership, and the Reconstructionist, a vivid and profound answer to modern Judaism, but one which appeals almost exclusively to intellectuals, which though philosophically satisfying, does not provide the average worshiper with the emotional basis for prayer. A un prejudicial analysis of interest to all questioning Jews whether or not they affiliate themselves with a particular school of thought. Rabbi Levinthal does not eugage in theological acrobatics, but provides a commonsensical basis for further thought.

Pub Date: Nov. 19, 1958

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Abelard-Schuman

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1958