A salt cellar would be handy for this hostile and violent condemnation of the U.S.S.R. The author, caught, with his family,...

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SOVIET PARADISE LOST

A salt cellar would be handy for this hostile and violent condemnation of the U.S.S.R. The author, caught, with his family, in an attempt to escape from the Soviet, was sentenced to eight years in a concentration camp with his brother and son. This is the narrative of his first year there (another to come will tell of his eventual escape) -- of the rigors, injustices and stupidities, the lack of food, sanitary conditions, accomodations, etc. -- and the parallel to life throughout Russia where the masses live in identical misery. Not as harrowing or sensational as, say, the Belbenoit (Dry Guillotine, Dutton), but an interesting exposÉ of a system in chaos, with plot and counterplot, irrationality and poverty rampant. The decided prejudice and bias make the authenticity doubtful and it is not, in spite of its subject, absorbing reading.

Pub Date: April 18, 1938

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Paisley Press

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1938