Slickly packaged (if deadly earnest) tips and reminders on staying out of harm's way when making important decisions. Russo...

READ REVIEW

DECISION TRAPS: Ten Barriers to Brilliant Decision-Making and How to Overcome Them

Slickly packaged (if deadly earnest) tips and reminders on staying out of harm's way when making important decisions. Russo (Marketing and Behavioral Sciences/Cornell) and Schoemaker (Decision Sciences and Policy/Univ. of Chicago) are forthright about their hopes that ""cognitive perspective"" could become the hot management concept of the 1990's, and offer a decalogue of pitfalls that may snare negligent individuals facing substantive decisions. Like the amplifying text, the authors' by-the-numbers list represents an odd coupling of colloquial common sense, buzzwords, and academic jargon. In brief, their catalogue of mistakes to be avoided encompass such blunders as: plunging in; frame blindness (i.e., overlooking available options or losing sight of key objectives); overconfidence; shortsightedness; shooting from the hip; group failure (assuming deliberative bodies will make wise choices); and not keeping track of results. Addressed as well are errors involving failure to define problems in need of solution, ignoring the implications of feedback, and neglecting to audit the decision-making process in an organized manner. Not every decision, Russo and Schoemaker gravely concede, is a big deal; indeed, they note, there are rules of thumb to help the hesitant over the jumps of ad-hoc judgment calls. In this context, one at least logical conclusion (reached after due consideration) would be that few people with their wits about them have any great need for the authors' frequently puerile and consistently pedantic counsel.

Pub Date: Nov. 22, 1989

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Doubleday

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Oct. 15, 1989