An utterly engrossing but rather perverse novel about characters who attempt to cut through the hypocrisy of our social...

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LIV

An utterly engrossing but rather perverse novel about characters who attempt to cut through the hypocrisy of our social institutions and relationships in ways so logical that to other people they appear absolutely kinky, immoral or even crazy. Dr. Rotha O(liv)ia Thatcher is a clinical psychologist who believes that the way to cure recidivist criminals is by brainwashing them, Korean War style, with a little bit of personal loving thrown in at times when in some way her patients arouse her prurient interest. She is of course anathema to the Delaware penal system and gets to exercise her theories only when an escaped multi-killer patient, Mo Garipo, enters her house to rape her -- getting much more than he asked for in true Collector fashion. Despite the sensationalism of Liv's dubiously vicious treatment (i.e. torture) and an off-into-the-sunset ending for the Doc and reformed con, the book has a hard-core honesty. The style is the rather floridly dramatic one that one would expect from the author of the screenplay Days of Wine and Roses, full of put-downs and bon mots that make the book rather more delightful to read than it perhaps should be.

Pub Date: March 1, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Dial

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: March 1, 1973