In a real novel, love exists (or not) only in its individual and various manifestations; in YA novels, especially those...

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BOUQUETS FOR BRIMBAL

In a real novel, love exists (or not) only in its individual and various manifestations; in YA novels, especially those dealing with homosexuality, it's a blanket trotted out to cover relationships that have no individual manifestations. In this entry, acquiescent Macy, the narrator, joins her would-be-actress best friend, Annie Brimbal, as an apprentice in summer stock. Macy, relegated to dreary chores in the prop room, is unhappy there until she falls in love with a young actor. Don is friendly but resists Macy's sexy ploys until near the end, when he takes her to his New York apartment and later declares that he loves her. When she's not thinking about Don, Macy broods about Annie, who spends most of her time with a young actress named Lola. Jealousy and a refusal to recognize that Annie is having a lesbian affair plague Macy until near the end, when the two old friends have one of those earnest long talks set up to answer readers' questions as well as Macy's. (""There's lotsa ways of lovin', huh?"" grins Macy, understanding.) But the lesbian relationship is little more than a topic for discussion, and Macy's own affair is pure daydream. We never get a sense of Don or an inkling of why he would fall for this infatuated teenager. On balance, a little more than a problem novel, a little more than a summer stock romance, but not much more than a combination of the two.

Pub Date: April 23, 1980

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper & Row

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1980