The birthplace of the winds is the Aleutian island hein where Ted Bank, as a graduate student of botany and anthropology at...

READ REVIEW

BIRTHPLACE OF THE WINDS

The birthplace of the winds is the Aleutian island hein where Ted Bank, as a graduate student of botany and anthropology at the University of Michigan, spent a recent enchanted summer on a virtually self propelled expedition. He describes it in a conversational, friendly style that pays readable attention to people and surroundings as well as the scientific aspects of his stay. With little more than hope to go , Bank and a friend of his began to plan for the expedition early in the year. They had the encouragement of the faculty but no backing from either the National Geographic Society nor a Harvard expedition to the same territory, and so reached a point where nerve and luck alone would get them there. In eattle, they convinced, the air force of the benefits to be obtained from their studies of Aleutian plant and animal life- and got their ride North. From there on it is sheer delight for the boys. At Adak, Atka and various other spots, they take to collecting, observing and cataloguing. There are periods when they are in close association with Aleutinus and their social problems and there is the great excitement of finding ancient village sites and burial grounds which may prove the Aleutians the oldest migrators from St.. For the author there is the added recognition of the government in its offer of a job as school teacher and supervisor in the Aleutians, which have come to be the favorite spot. Spirited and engaging.

Pub Date: April 9, 1956

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Crowell

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1956