Corny and contrived, but fairly enjoyable on a mindless, bloodthirsty level: revenge-melodrama from veteran Higgins (The...

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A SEASON IN HELL

Corny and contrived, but fairly enjoyable on a mindless, bloodthirsty level: revenge-melodrama from veteran Higgins (The Eagle Has Landed, Solo, etc.), as a fearless hero and a noble heroine--no sex or romance here, mind you--crisscross Europe to expose an anonymous, elusive super-villain. Sean Egan, maverick SAS operative, is aghast to learn that his dear foster-sister has drowned in the Thames. Sarah Talbot, 40-ish American stockbroker/socialite, is shattered when she hears that her beloved stepson has died in Paris of a drug overdose. Then, however, Sean and Sarah learn that their loved ones, killed by the same exotic poison, were both victims of the mysterious drug-mogul known as ""Mr. Smith."" So Sean and Sarah team up to identify Mr. Smith and wreak vengeance: after some hand-to-hand-combat training, they seek out witnesses in Paris, assisted by Sean's rough but lovable Uncle Jack, an old-time gangster. Unbeknownst to our heroes, however, their every move is being monitored by creepy Jago, Mr. Smith's top henchman/enforcer--who manages to kill most of the vital witnesses just before they can Tell All. Worse yet, when Sarah impulsively goes to Sicily to quiz one of Mr. Smith's mob connections, she winds up in the middle of a Mafia feud--and is rescued, just barely, by Sean (who parachutes in at precisely the right moment). And finally, when they learn that Mr. Smith is in cahoots with a fanatic Protestant leader in Northern Ireland, the duo defies the powers-that-be and sneaks over to Ireland--via freight-train jumping and motor-cruiser--for another bloody showdown. . .before the shocking (!) identity of Mr. Smith (!!) is finally revealed (!!!) Despite the 1980's violence and a few trendy touches: an unabashed throwback to sub-Buchan-esque pulp of the Twenties and Thirties--and lively enough folderol for undemanding armchair adventurers.

Pub Date: Jan. 31, 1988

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1988