A demure Cinderella Regency--in which a shockingly bruised, high-born lass byes to see her tormentors thoroughly de-ranged....

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SONG FOR A LADY

A demure Cinderella Regency--in which a shockingly bruised, high-born lass byes to see her tormentors thoroughly de-ranged. Lady Deborah Martin is despised by her father, the Earl of Selvington, because her Mum (his wife #2) ran off to Italy with a music master, taking Deborah with her. Still, now that both Mum and music-master are dead, the Earl has grudgingly taken Deborah into his stately English home to live with her half-sisters: horrid, spindly Elaine and woolly-headed, essentially kind Clare (plus unhelpful brother Terence). Even worse is wicked, gorgeous Cousin Melanie. And when Deborah is exiled by her irate father after she insults handsome Lord Foxborough (she felt he'd insulted her by a kiss and lascivious hints), she's forced to be a companion/ servant to tormentor Melanie. . . who herself yearns for Foxborough. Lord F., however, continues to hover around Deborah, even at the opera; Deborah, determined to fly free of Melanie and the lot of them, auditions for a theater career--with unsavory results; Melanie and Elaine work out a plan to get rid of Deborah and make sure she's miserable, despite a just-discovered (but concealed) legacy. So it's abduction ho!--with justice served all around, subplot romances sorted out (both Clare and Terence have unsuitable paramours), and Cinderella resplendent. Not up to Diamond's Lady in Disguise (1982) in jolly complexities, but nimble and easy-gaited.

Pub Date: April 1, 1983

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Walker

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: April 1, 1983