Told in the third person, Chinese style, this is the autobiography of a 24 year old American-Chinese girl, brought up in San...

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FIFTH CHINESE DAUGHTER

Told in the third person, Chinese style, this is the autobiography of a 24 year old American-Chinese girl, brought up in San Francisco's Chinatown. It is a story of two worlds, two civilizations, two consciences at war until a final adjustment is made. For Jade Snow did well in both her schools -- American and Chinese, she was a dutiful daughter until the question of college arose and then the American training was stronger than the Chinese and she went to Mills College where a love of pottery-making was developed which, in turn, proved eventually to be the link that brought her back to her people. There was war work, in the shipyards, where she even christened a ship, there were her parents, fighting the inroads on their life of tradition, all her family who had little approval for the independent course she had taken -- and there was the pottery shop which brought them all together. An intimate picture of Chinese household life and customs, of the clash when the American way takes hold, and of the bridging that is possible -- this is an honest self-portrait of a first generation American.

Pub Date: Sept. 13, 1950

ISBN: 0295968265

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harper

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Sept. 1, 1950