Joyce's contention, in a nutshell, is that the U. N. reflects the growing failure of national sovereignty in world affairs...

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REVOLUTION ON EAST RIVER

Joyce's contention, in a nutshell, is that the U. N. reflects the growing failure of national sovereignty in world affairs and the growing sovereignty of man himself. Searching a decade of policy and travail in U. N. history, Joyce's deepest impressions are of the rapid development of the international body as a congress of peoples rather than governments, its faith and concern over the individual, its steadfast promoting of the interests of all smaller and underprivileged countries. In a more particular sense, Joyce heralds the first of the new world citizens- the Ralph Bunche and Lord Orr type that rises above national interests in behalf of all men. As the author himself confesses, the meanings of the disarmaments controversy, the Bandung Conference, violence in Egypt are open to opposite conclusions. Yet he remains firm and persuasive in his optimism. The book has a tendency to overemphasize and also to oversimplify. Joyce is the author of World in the Making and has spent his career as an observer and participant in both Geneva and New York.

Pub Date: Feb. 15, 1957

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Abelard-Schuman

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Feb. 1, 1957