For most of us arms limitation negotiations means SALT, something sprinkled in the back of our minds for seasoning but not...

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HOW TO THINK ABOUT ARMS CONTROL AND DISARMAMENT

For most of us arms limitation negotiations means SALT, something sprinkled in the back of our minds for seasoning but not substantive fare. After all, turning hydrogen bombs into plow shares is an idealistic notion, consigned to the back pages of expectations. That's what we've learned, and Dr. Dougherty, a political scientist from Saint Joseph's College and former professor at the National War College, drives home the point here, questioning whether the very limited Moscow Agreements (out of SALT Phase I) might not pose a threat to the security of the U.S.A. (keep your suspicious eye on Phase II, currently being discussed, warns Dougherty). This is not the position paper of a hawk. Or a dove. Rather, Dougherty lauds disarmament discussions, although he concurrently cautions against any easy settlement. Somewhere in the mushy middle, perceiving that while ""total disarmament"" lies ""beyond man's present reach"" there is hope: ""All the nuclear powers in varying degrees have manifested some awareness of the need for managing military power wisely and cautiously."" Or how to live with the bomb and unenjoy it.

Pub Date: July 18, 1973

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Crane, Russak

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: July 1, 1973