This addition to the Library of Protestant Thought centers upon the writings of the two leaders of the so-called Mercersburg...

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THE MERCERSBURG THEOLOGY

This addition to the Library of Protestant Thought centers upon the writings of the two leaders of the so-called Mercersburg theology, John Nevin and Philip Schaff. The editor gives a very comprehensive introduction to the theological situation in America, in which the Mercersburg theological development succeeded the decline of New England Calvinism and for a time provided the main point of contact between American churchmen and the rising nineteenth century German theological movements. Nevin and Schaff, separated in years, formed a close affinity for each other while they were associated with the college and seminary that gave the movement its name. They wrote and spoke voluminously, on matters ranging from theological doctrine to liturgical revisions. Their position held similarities with High Church American Lutheranism and the Anglo-Catholic movement of Newman and Pusey in England, and was informed by a spirit of ecumenism quite surprising for the sectarian times in which they lived. The selections included are drawn from printed materials and some manuscript sources. The larger part is given to Schaff's work, and is limited to his Mercersburg years, before he gained fame as a church historian at Union Theological Seminary, after the Civil War. This is a scholarly work, suitable mainly for scholars and theological students. It maintains the high standard set by earlier volumes in this series.

Pub Date: Nov. 17, 1966

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Oxford

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Nov. 1, 1966