It is difficult to see any reason for publishing this undistinguished autobiography of James Cox, whose chief claim to fame...

READ REVIEW

THE JOURNEY THROUGH MY YEARS

It is difficult to see any reason for publishing this undistinguished autobiography of James Cox, whose chief claim to fame is that he was once defeated for the Presidency of the United States, although by whom or when, I doubt if one person out of a hundred could tell you. (It was by Harding, in 1920.) Neither informative nor entertaining, it is written in a dull, bromidic style as uninspired as are his memories. Early in the book, he says that he owes much to McGuffey's readers, and it is easy to credit this statement. In fact, one wonders if he has ever read anything else. The book deals interminably with now forgotten political figures in Ohio and members of Congress in 1908, many of whom were relatively obscure even in their hey-day. When he does mention familiar names, such as Champ Clark, Joe Cannon, and down through Franklin Roosevelt, it is to add nothing new or interesting. I can't imagine anyone wanting to read the book, with the possible exception of Mr. Cox's relatives and a few old political cronies, and even they will be neither angered nor delighted, so mediocre is the whole tone and content.

Pub Date: Dec. 9, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Simon & Schuster

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Dec. 1, 1946