Warburg has a certain ability to clarify rather abstruse subjects, and here treate a fairly special subject in somewhat...

READ REVIEW

UNWRITTEN TREATY

Warburg has a certain ability to clarify rather abstruse subjects, and here treate a fairly special subject in somewhat special detail. A discussion of the first of the four freedoms, freedom of information, as it has been observed during the war, its implications for after the peace. Examining the difference between information and propoganda, Warburg, who served with the OWI, shows how propaganda was used by the Axis and counteracted by the Allies, and points up the failures of our foreign information program, the absence of any pro-democratic policy, the side-stepping of the ideological, the stressing of the military. This book -- both in handling past and future -- emphasizes the need for an international agreement to keep countries truly informed, to eliminate psychological warfare, to redefine propaganda... Important in its field -- but special.

Pub Date: Jan. 24, 1946

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Harcourt, Brace

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Jan. 1, 1946