Seven all-American film stars emerged from the Golden Age of Hollywood to become world-famed for the national virtues each...

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THE ALL-AMERICANS

Seven all-American film stars emerged from the Golden Age of Hollywood to become world-famed for the national virtues each projected. Until Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, the 1936 Frank Capra comedy, Gary Cooper shone with natural manliness that dissolved every wall between himself and his audiences. That movie, however, introduced a new Cooper, more mannered, ""with a set bag of acting tricks to ingratiate himself with viewers. . . . Whether it be scratching his ear, or the slow take as his eyes uplift to reexamine a person or object, it all became part of the Cooper style."" Gone was the short-spoken, naive but knowing man; we got instead an actor with an easy capacity to woo and delight. From such small but telling points, Parish and Stanke construct the career images of Coop, Henry Fonda, William Holden, Rock Hudson, Fred MacMurray, Ronald Reagan, and James Stewart. Whether it is Fonda's endearing ""resiliency of spirit,"" the no-crap, handsome affability of Bill Holden, MacMurray's breezy manner and belligerent smile, or Jimmy Stewart's drawling, magical sincerity--all are captured, without fluff or excuses for misfires.

Pub Date: Aug. 1, 1977

ISBN: N/A

Page Count: -

Publisher: Arlington House

Review Posted Online: N/A

Kirkus Reviews Issue: Aug. 1, 1977